A Year in Privacy: How did we do in 2014?

A Year in Privacy: How did we do in 2014?

Heather Parry

By Heather Parry

29 December 2014

On Christmas Eve, the Electronic Frontier Foundation released their report on the world of web encryption in 2014.

Although the last year has been disappointing in terms of privacy in a number of ways, the EFF report shows us that there are actually many reasons to be cheerful.

Starting with Yahoo in January, many major organizations and websites have dedicated themselves to encryption in 2014; Automattic, Tumblr and Google all stated their preferences for secure sites, with Automattic serving only HTTPS sites and Tumblr encrypting all its 189 million blogs.

Apple and Android got behind the movement by going for default encryption on all their latest releases, and both Mozilla and Google made privacy-friendly statements late in the year.

However, 2014 has also been the year of Heartbleed, POODLE and a number of other lower-profile security vulnerabilities that threatened the data and privacy of millions across the globe. On the face of it, these long-running but only recently-discovered vulnerabilities seem to undermine the idea that we’re secure online; however, the fast response to these issues and the increased security following their discovery means that we end 2014 in a better place than we started it.

Although encryption is becoming more rapidly taken up, there are still huge sections of the web that are unsecured – and only you can secure your own computer or mobile device. Visit surfeasy.com/register today to start taking control of your own online security, with our Unlimited plan protecting up to five devices for just $4.99 per month.

Take control of your privacy in 2015!

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