Your Privacy Round Up—November

Heather Parry

By Heather Parry

27 November 2018

We all know that it’s important to stay informed, especially when it comes to things like online security. But with so much information to take in, it can be hard to keep up with what’s going on in the privacy world.

That’s why we’re bringing you a monthly round-up of the biggest privacy news—the stuff you really shouldn’t miss.

Check out the privacy headlines this month—and stay informed.

A US version of the EU’s GDPR legislation could land in early 2019

According to Reuters, Democratic Senator Richard Blumenthal and Republican Jerry Moran are working together on a bipartisan privacy bill to rival the EU’s GDPR, which went into force earlier this year. Moran is chairman of the consumer protection, product safety, insurance and data security subcommittee. The bill is hoped to be ready early next year.

British privacy advocates alarmed by Google’s takeover of UK health app

Privacy campaigners in the UK have signalled their alarm this week after Google announced that the health portion of its AI lab DeepMind, based in London, would be transferred into the hands of US-based Google Health. According to privacy advocates, this restructuring breaks Google’s promise that DeepMind “data will never be connected to Google accounts or services”.

Uber fined $493,000 for losing 2.7 million British customers’ data

The Information Commissioner’s Office in the UK has fined the company over a 2016 data breach that saw the full names, addresses and phone numbers of British customers stolen by hackers. Dutch data regulators also fined the company €600,000 over the same attack, as the details of 174,000 Dutch customers were also affected.

New Zealand has banned a major telecom provider from using Huawei equipment as several countries consider the company a security risk

Following expressions of concern from US and Australian governments regarding phone company Huawei’s links with the Chinese government, New Zealand has stopped Spark importing Huawei kit to use on its new 5G network. The Director-General of the Government Communications Security Bureau stated that using the company’s equipment would “raise significant national security risks.”

We’ll bring you another privacy round up at the end of next month.

Until then, stay safe online.

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