US Supreme Court will not hear industry challenge to the FCC's former Net Neutrality rules

Heather Parry

By Heather Parry

06 November 2018

The Federal Communication Commission (FCC)’s 2015 Net Neutrality protections are no more; new FCC head Ajit Pai overturned the rules successfully earlier this year.

Yet industry lobbyists, including AT&T, have still been trying to overturn court decisions that upheld those Net Neutrality rules—in order to kill Net Neutrality forever.

Internet providers and broadband industry lobbyists were appealing to the Supreme Court to make a decision in their favour, as this would effectively prevent future attempts to regulate the industry in the event of Democrats retaking control of the FCC.

However, this week the Supreme Court said that it would not hear the industry’s challenge to the FCC’s former Net Neurality rules. Of the nine Supreme Court justices, four must agree to hear petitions, and only three did—meaning that petitions filed by lobby groups NCTA, CTIA, USTelecom and the American Cable Association, as well as AT&T, will not be heard.

Yet this is not the end of attempts to save Net Neutrality; far from it.

As well as California’s attempts to install strong Net Neutrality laws in the state, the FCC is defending itself against a lawsuit filed by number of litigants. As ever, the fight continues.

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