Your Privacy Round Up—February

Heather Parry

By Heather Parry

27 February 2018

We all know that it’s important to stay informed, especially when it comes to things like online security. But with so much information to take in, it can be hard to keep up with what’s going on in the privacy world.

That’s why we’re bringing you a monthly round-up of the biggest privacy news—the stuff you really shouldn’t miss.

Check out the privacy headlines this month—and stay informed.

iPhone boot-up source code leaked to GitHub in “biggest leak in history”

An unknown source posted what was allegedly part of the code from iBoot, the secure boot-up portion of iOS. Apple acted quickly, issuing a DMCA legal takedown request to GitHub, who subsequently removed the code—but the snipper was already copied and was known to be in circulation on the web.

Winter Olympics opening ceremony hit by cyberattack

During the opening ceremony of the Games, the official website was taken offline, some internal servers were crashed, public WiFi was disrupted and some TV systems were also affected. However, all operations were restored within twelve hours, meaning that the systems were fully operational by the Saturday morning.

Hackers hijack Tesla’s cloud to mine cryptocurrency

Cryptojackers were found to have breached the security of Tesla’s Amazon Web Services cloud account and had installed malware to mine cryptocurrency, co-opting the company’s computer power to do so.

U.S. Supreme Court unsure of how to resolve Microsoft privacy case

Microsoft and the Justice Department are engaged in a dispute over overseas data storage. It’s argued that U.S. law should allow prosecutors to force companies to hand over data stored overseas—but Microsoft disagrees. A ruling is due by the end of June.

We’ll bring you another privacy round up at the end of next month.

Until then, stay safe online.

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